TOM MURRIN CHECKLIST

Tom Murrin
Arsenal Soccer Fan (with Golden Beard)
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
17 3/4 x 12 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
We Don’t Need No Stinking Badges
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
12 x 18 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
Happy Jack (inworld.com)
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
18 x 12 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
My Nubian Princess
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
18 x 12 1/4 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
Notre Dame Fan from Beyond (for Gene Calhoun)
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
17 x 11 1/2 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
Happy Face the Clown
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
18 x 12 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
Mr. Southwesterner
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
12 x 18 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
Emissary from the Planet Gorn
From the “Modern Bohemian Series”, 2006
Mixed media
18 x 12 1/4 x 1 in.

Tom Murrin
The Naked Truth, 1990-91
Mixed media
54 x 28 x 1 in.
“Used in performances at Dixon Place, La Mama, P.S. 122, and other venues.  Because of its  nature, I used it always as an entry costume.  I needed help putting it on, so that was all a back-stage kind of thing, and it made a funny entry costume.”

Tom Murrin
Rising Sun, 1981-82                                                                                                        
Mixed media
20 1/2 x 14 x 4
“Since these masks were always kept at my moms LA home, I would have used them in shows out here like at LACE, or the Anti-Club, or Highways or Al’s Bar or other clubs I played when I came to LA.”

Tom Murrin
Doctor Penis del Sol, 1981-82
Mixed media
29 x 12 x 3 in.
“Since these masks were always kept at my moms LA home, I would have used them in shows out here like at LACE, or the Anti-Club, or Highways or Al’s Bar or other clubs I played when I came to LA.”

Tom Murrin
Spider Eye, 1976-77
Mixed media
22 x 9 x 5 in.
“Spider Eye this is probably the oldest.  It might have been in the April Fools Day show at the Fox Theater in Venice with Worlds Greatest Theater Company.”

Tom Murrin
Mr. Ectoplasm, At Your Service, 1984-85
Mixed media
18 x 20 x 1 in.
Collection Brian Patchett, New York
“Made in NYC  used in shows  at 8 B.C., Chandalier, Pyramid, King Tuts Wah-Wah Hut, etc.”

Tom Murrin
Happy Sun, 1984-85
Mixed media
28 1/2 x 23 1/4 x 1/4 in.
“Happy Sun  1984-5  another NYC mask used in a lot of shows  especially Spring and Summer shows.”

Tom Murrin
Mask to Show How Plumbing Works, 1999
Mixed media
19 x 11 1/2 x 1 1/2 in.
“I made this for some exhibit and I don’t think I used it in any shows.”

Tom Murrin
Tommy Longo’s Parka with Hockey Goalie Mask in the Springtime, 1986-87
Mixed media
8 x 7 x 4
“Hockey goalie mask was shown in the exhibit with the parka because of its colorfulness. I often used it in Spring shows, and by Spring shows I mean that a lot of my shows over  the course of a year will be salutes to the current season, weather changes, etc.  A part of the show would be about the changes going on and then I would talk about how I was changed too.  The more colorful masks would to fit in to that kind of theme, e.g. the buds popping, the flowers blooming, etc.”

Tom Murrin
Don’t Mess With Me, 1986-87
Mixed media
16 3/4 x 17 x 1 in.
“I often did shows at clubs that would have an aggressive tone, which probably came from the fact that a lot of my early solo shows in NYC clubs (starting in 1978) were in front of rock and punk audiences - CBGB, Maxs, Club 57, so I knew right off the bat, I wasnt going to be doing any soft salute to spring-like shows, and so I made masks that were punk, and did shows that might be about violence, and how to deal with it, etc.  Later, when downtown NYC was a little rougher, I did certain Fashions  for Defense shows at PS 122, La Mama, Theater for the New  City  but I was always in your face”

Tom Murrin
Penguin and Batman, 1984-85
Mixed media
22 1/4 x 18 x 2

Tom Murrin
Elephant, 1986-87
Mixed media
41 x 33 x 1/2 in.
“Elephant 1986-7, and Warrior with Headache 1988: These were used in some of my Tribal Ritual shows.  I have always considered my shows to be a type of ritual, granted they are comic rituals, but they have a form and a purpose and there is hopefully is some change from the beginning to the end.  So, dance and masks and purposeful behavior are a  part of these shows.  They might have been used at Franklin Furnace, Chandalier, King Tuts Wah Wah Hut, and some of the performances might have been rituals to change your luck, get a new job, or a new girlfriend, etc.”

Tom Murrin
Warrior with a Headache, 1988                                                                                               
Mixed media
40 x 21 1 1/2 in.
“...and Warrior with Headache, 1988: These were used in some of my Tribal Ritual shows.  I have always considered my shows to be a type of ritual, granted they are comic rituals, but they have a form and a purpose and there is hopefully is some change from the beginning to the end.  So, dance and masks and purposeful behavior are a  part of these shows.  They might have been used at Franklin Furnace, Chandalier, King Tuts Wah Wah Hut, and some of the performances might have been rituals to change your luck, get a new job, or a new girlfriend, etc.”

Tom Murrin
Jingle Bells, 1983-85
Mixed media
13 x 21 1/2 x 1 in.
“Jingle Bells,1983-5, and Red Donkeys Offspring,1983-5, I think these were made in LA out of  foam core scraps that Johanna Went had given me. Jingle Bells was probably used in some Xmas holiday shows”

Tom Murrin
Red Donkey’s Offspring, 1983-85
Mixed media
29 x 14 x 1 1/2 in.
“...and Red Donkeys Offspring,1983-5, I think these were made in LA out of  foam core scraps that Johanna Went had given me. Jingle Bells was probably used in some Xmas holiday shows”

Tom Murrin
Hey, Let’s Slam, 1985-86
Mixed media
24 x 9 x 1 in.
Collection Brian Patchett, New York
“Was used in club shows in L.A., e.g. Anti-Club, Als bar, etc.

Tom Murrin
Double Mask (An Old Van Gogh and A Young Dylan Thomas), 1985-86
Mixed media
61 x 15 x 1/2 in.
“was used in numerous shows.  The idea was to put on the mask, show the front portrait, say something about that, and then drop that mask, which revealed the other portrait.  I like this idea of quick-changing masks, and I have some back in NYC that I didnt bring out for the exhibit that are 3 and 5 face masks.  Same principle.”

Tom Murrin
Self-Portrait of Tom Murrin as A Young Surfer, 1977
with Moustache and Sunburn
Mixed media
9 x 9 x 1/2 in.
“an LA mask.  I must have used it in shows when I was talking about myself as a  much younger guy growing up in So Cal.

Tom Murrin
Suspicious Woman, 1987
Mixed media
20 x 15 x 1/2 in.

Tom Murrin
Baby Ruth, 1984
Mixed media
25 x 20 1/2 x 1/2
“I used this mask a lot.  I would say it was my sister Patsy and how she liked candy.  Then I would then stick a few candy bars (with double stick tape) all  over the front of The mask.  I apologize, Patsy.”

Tom Murrin
Mr. Choppers, 1984
Mixed media
10 x 12 x 4 in.
Collection Brian Patchett, New York
“This was another of my 3-dimensional masks.  Just something unusual sticking out from the flat front, which seemed to make people laugh by that fact alone.”

Tom Murrin
Guy with Measles, 1985-86
Mixed media
14 3/4 x 15 x 1 in.
“Another mask that got a laugh, because the hole in the mask let my nose and mouth have a 3-d effect.  I wouldn’t always call him a guy with measles.  He might just be a guy with spots on his face.”

Tom Murrin
G-R-R-R, 1982-83
Mixed media
22 x 12 x 5 in.
“This was another of my punk rock masks used a lot in NYC clubs in the early 80s,  and of course, it doesn’t have to be a punk rocker, it can just be someone angry.”

Tom Murrin
Ancient Warrior, 1982-83
Mixed media
22 1/2 x 13 1/2 x 1/2 in.

Tom Murrin
Q-Tip Mask, 1981-82
Mixed media
16 3/4 x 26 1/2 x 1/2 in.
“This is actually a paper bag that I painted with warrior colors so I could look like a warrior.  I just added the q-tips because they seemed to fit.  It also has a small  whistle that works where the mouth hole is.”

Tom Murrin
Large Primary Colors Mask, 2005                                                                                               
Mixed media
38 x 33 x 9 in.
“I found this box with the cellophane already there, added a couple of eyes, and wore it in a show I did at Crazy Space, Santa Monica, Jan 2005.  I used it to describe a person who was peeping into a window, watching a man and a woman getting ready for bed.”

Tom Murrin
Pablo Picasso, 1985-86
Mixed media
25 x 15 x 1 in.
Collection Brian Patchett, New York
“This was made at the same time as Hey, Lets Slam.  Johanna Went had given me these 2 scraps of foam core that she had spray-painted with a flesh-colored paint.  I just used the flesh-color backing and added a few things to make it a face, and when I  looked at it, I thought, Hey, that looks like Picasso.”

Tom Murrin
Lady with Psychedelic Vision, 1984-85            
Mixed media
17 1/4 x 16 x 1/2 in.
“This was used in shows where I was talking about acid trips, and there were plenty of  those shows since my shows, (which includes props, masks and dialogue) were always so surreal.  I could always talk about drug experiences and people would understand.”

Tom Murrin
Mr. Grouch, 1988-89                                    
Mixed media
23 x 15 x 1/2 in.
“This was an LA mask used out here primarily.  It seems to me to be a combination of Moe of the 3 Stooges and Arnold Schwartzenegger.”

Tom Murrin
Fluorescent Alien, 1986-87                                    
Mixed media
11 1/4 x 9 1/4 x 1/2
“Since I am Alien Comic, I often do shows where aliens play a part, and this is a ready mask for that purpose.”

Tom Murrin
Very Important Movie Producer, 1984-85
Mixed media
48 x 10 x 4 in.
“This is one of my few full-length masks.  I liked doing them, because it presents a fuller picture when I am talking about somebody.  Here the character has his own built in phone with a nice long cord, which makes a funny visual if I put it on, and then  talk on the phone.”

Tom Murrin
Big Guy with Bloody Nose, 1988-89
Mixed media
45 x 27 x 1/2 in.
Collection Tom Patchett, Los Angeles
“This is another large mask.  I just added some red cellophane, which would be rolled up and inside the nose of the mask.  When I put the mask on, I would tell a story about him getting hit in the nose and how it bleed.  Then I would just pull out the cellophane.  I have always said that my shows are just glorified show and tells.”

Tom Murrin
Little Billy, 1984-85
Mixed media
39 x 29 x 3 in.
“This is something I wear.  The purple ribbon goes around my head. He is just a very lucky, smart kind of a guy.  I dont know why, but I always feel that when I use him in a show, he always has some good advice, or occasions some good result to follow.  I guess he’s a good spirit type of prop, and is always used in that context.”

Tom Murrin
Black Star Demon, 1987-88
Mixed media
25 x 15 x 1/2 in.
“...on the other hand, this would be a negative type of mask.”

Tom Murrin
New Shades, 1983-84
Mixed media
11 x 12 1/2 x 1/2 in.

Tom Murrin
Dada Mask, 1982
Mixed media
11 x 12 1/2 x 1/2 in.
“This was made out of a cardboard box that was used as a mailed package, and so it still has the postage.  I noticed how the Dadaists often had postage on their artworks.”

Tom Murrin
Grandpop Flattop with Psychedelic Beard, 1984-85
Mixed media
22 x 9 x 1/2 in.
“I made this at the same time as the Lady with Psychedleic Vision because I can see that I used the same type of triangular strips of colored paper.  He is just another funny character and would be used to tell an old man’s story.”

Tom Murrin
“El Hippo” (Lucha Libre mask), 1983-84
Mixed media
16 x 11 x 1 in.
“I made a few of these Lucha Libre masks.  I really like that style of mask, and that there’s an entire genre of Mexican wrestlers that wears these masks and keeps their identities secret, even out of the ring.”

Tom Murrin
Mr. Romance, 1987-88
Mixed media
13 x 12 x 1/2 in.
“I have worn this mask in many shows in NYC.  Lots of Dixon Place shows over the years.  For some reason the color of shiny purple means romance to me.  So, whenever I am talking about someone in a romantic mood, I can put this mask on and I will know the feeling.  Invariably, people laugh at the mask and me calling it Mr. Romance.  It always gets a chuckle.”